Doctor in scrubs


W8MD Diet | COVID-19 portal | Vitamin D | Vaccine | Keto

WikiMD is the world's largest medical encyclopedia with
29,037 pages, 4,107,582 edits & 35,762,818 views.

Free unbiased diet, health and wellness info!

Heparin

From WikiMD's free health, diet & wellness encyclopedia
(Redirected from Clivarin)
Jump to navigation Jump to search
This page contains changes which are not marked for translation.

Information about Heparin

Standard or unfractionated heparin is a complex mixture of naturally occurring glycosaminoglycans and is used as an anticoagulant to treat venous thrombosis or to prevent thrombosis in high risk patients.  Heparin therapy is associated with frequent elevations in serum aminotransferase levels that are typically transient and not associated with clinical symptoms or significant liver injury.

Heparin
Heparin

Liver safety of Heparin

Mechanism of action of Heparin

Heparin (hep' a rin) is a complex mixture of naturally occurring glycosaminoglycans that have potent anticoagulant activity.  Heparin has been used to treat or prevent venous thromboses for more than 50 years.  Multiple generic forms of heparin are available, usually in ampoules or vials of 1000 to 40,000 units per mL.  Heparin is typically given initially as 5000 to 10,000 units intravenously, followed by intravenous or subcutaneous boluses every 4 to 12 hours to keep the activated partial thrombin time in the range of 1.5 to 2 times the control value. Common side effects of standard heparin include dizziness, fatigue, headache, indigestion, nausea, excess bleeding, ecchymoses, rash and urticaria.

The low molecular weight heparins enoxaparin, dalteparin and tinzaparin are purified fragments of natural heparins that have anticoagulant activity and are used to treat patients at high risk of venous thrombosis. 

Heparin
Heparin

Liver safety of Heparin

The low molecular weight heparins are associated with serum enzyme elevations during therapy that are usually asymptomatic and resolve rapidly upon stopping; the low molecular weight heparins have not been implicated in cases of acute, clinically apparent, idiosyncratic liver injury.

Mechanism of action of Heparin

Low molecular weight heparins are prepared from natural heparins isolated from porcine intestine or bovine lung by controlled depolymerization of the large natural heparin molecule (which has varying molecular weights averaging ~15,000 daltons) into smaller fragments and subsequent fractionation to obtain homogenous heparin fragments with biological activity and molecular weight averaging 4,000-5,000 daltons (range, 2,000-9,000 daltons).  The low molecular weight heparins have the advantage of more favorable pharmacokinetics and fewer side effects, which allow for once daily administration and outpatient use.  The onset of anticoagulation may be slower with low molecular weight compared to standard heparin, but the degree of anticoagulation is easier to maintain and manage.  The mechanism of action of low molecular weight heparins is similar to that of standard heparin and involves binding to antithrombin III and inhibition of activated coagulation factors including thrombin and Factor IX.  Current indications include prevention of deep vein thromboses in high risk individuals (such as after surgery or during immobilization), prevention of ischemic complications in patients with unstable angina (in combination with aspirin), and active treatment of deep vein thrombosis with or without pulmonary embolism (in combination with warfarin).  Common side effects of the low molecular weight heparins include dizziness, fatigue, headache, indigestion, nausea, bleeding, ecchymoses, rash and urticaria. The dose regimen of the low molecular weight heparins varies by product, concentration units (mg vs anti-Factor IX IU) and indication.  The typical regimen of treatment is once daily for 7 to 14 days, but longer term treatment is sometimes used in high risk situations including during cancer chemotherapy where there is a high risk of venous thomboses. 

Enoxaparin (ee nox' a par' in) was the first small molecular weight heparin (average 4,500 daltons) to be approved for use in the United States (1993) and is available in liquid solution in several forms (ampoules, syringes) generically and under the brand name Lovenox.    Dalteparin (dal' te par' in) (average 5,000 daltons) was approved in the United States in 1994 and is available in liquid solution in single or multidose vials under the brand name Fragmin.    Tinzaparin (tin" za par' in) (average 4,500-5,500 daltons) was approved for use in the United States in 2000 and has more restricted indications. Tinzaparin is available as solution for injection in multidose vials under the brand name Innohep. 

Cost and Coupons - Heparin

Reviews for Heparin

Learn more about Heparin

Latest research (Pubmed)

PubMed
Wikipedia

External links


edit 

WikiMD needs you!

This WikiMD article Heparin is a stub.
If you are a healthcare professional familiar with the topic Heparin, or
A subject matter expert or authority on Heparin, you can help us.
About | Mission | Paid editors welcome!

Heparin is part of WikiMD's Physician reviewed^ articles available 4free, 4all, 4ever!
Medicine: Health - Encyclopedia‏‎‏‎ - Topics‏‎ -‏‎ Diseases‏‎ - Cancer - Rare diseases - Random Page Navigation: Drugs - Wellness - Obesity‏‎ - Diet - Ketogenic diet - W8MD weight loss diet - Editors: Recently Edited Pages - Alphabetical Order - Sponsors - USMLE The content on or accessible through WikiMD is for informational purposes only. WikiMD is not a substitute for professional medical advice. ^See full Disclaimers
W8MD weight loss logo

Ad. Tired of being overweight?. W8MD's physician weight loss program can HELP*
Special: W8MD's tele-weight loss consultations only $99.99. Call 718-946-5500. Limited acceptance.