Metatarsophalangeal Articulations

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Anatomy > Gray's Anatomy of the Human Body > III. Syndesmology > 7h. Metatarsophalangeal Articulations

Henry Gray (1821–1865). Anatomy of the Human Body. 1918.

Metatarsophalangeal Articulations

Articulationes Metatarsophalangeæ


The metatarsophalangeal articulations are of the condyloid kind, formed by the reception of the rounded heads of the metatarsal bones in shallow cavities on the ends of the first phalanges. The ligaments are the plantar and two collateral.

The Plantar Ligaments (ligamenta accessoria plantaria; glenoid ligaments of Cruveilhier;)—The plantar ligaments are thick, dense, fibrous structures. They are placed on the plantar surfaces of the joints in the intervals between the collateral ligaments, to which they are connected; they are loosely united to the metatarsal bones, but very firmly to the bases of the first phalanges. Their plantar surfaces are intimately blended with the transverse metatarsal ligament, and grooved for the passage of the Flexor tendons, the sheaths surrounding which are connected to the sides of the grooves. Their deep surfaces form part of the articular facets for the heads of the metatarsal bones, and are lined by synovial membrane.

The Collateral Ligaments (ligamenta collateralia; lateral ligaments)—The collateral ligaments are strong, rounded cords, placed one on either side of each joint, and attached, by one end, to the posterior tubercle on the side of the head of the metatarsal bone, and, by the other, to the contiguous extremity of the phalanx. The place of dorsal ligaments is supplied by the Extensor tendons on the dorsal surfaces of the joints.

Movements—The movements permitted in the metatarsophalangeal articulations are flexion, extension, abduction, and adduction.


Gray's Anatomy


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