CT scan

From WikiMD free wellness and medical encyclopedia
(Redirected from Computed tomography)
Jump to: navigation, search

CT scan stands for Computerized Tomography. Computed tomography (CT) is a type of imaging. It uses special x-ray equipment to make cross-sectional pictures of your body. During some tests you receive a contrast dye, which makes parts of your body show up better in the image.

The term “computed tomography”, or CT, refers to a computerized x-ray imaging procedure in which a narrow beam of x-rays is aimed at a patient and quickly rotated around the body, producing signals that are processed by the machine’s computer to generate cross-sectional images—or “slices”—of the body. These slices are called tomographic images and contain more detailed information than conventional x-rays. Once a number of successive slices are collected by the machine’s computer, they can be digitally “stacked” together to form a three-dimensional image of the patient that allows for easier identification and location of basic structures as well as possible tumors or abnormalities.

How does CT work?

Unlike a conventional x-ray—which uses a fixed x-ray tube—a CT scanner uses a motorized x-ray source that rotates around the circular opening of a donut-shaped structure called a gantry. During a CT scan, the patient lies on a bed that slowly moves through the gantry while the x-ray tube rotates around the patient, shooting narrow beams of x-rays through the body. Instead of film, CT scanners use special digital x-ray detectors, which are located directly opposite the x-ray source. As the x-rays leave the patient, they are picked up by the detectors and transmitted to a computer.

Each time the x-ray source completes one full rotation, the CT computer uses sophisticated mathematical techniques to construct a 2D image slice of the patient. The thickness of the tissue represented in each image slice can vary depending on the CT machine used, but usually ranges from 1-10 millimeters. When a full slice is completed, the image is stored and the motorized bed is moved forward incrementally into the gantry. The x-ray scanning process is then repeated to produce another image slice. This process continues until the desired number of slices is collected.

Image slices can either be displayed individually or stacked together by the computer to generate a 3D image of the patient that shows the skeleton, organs, and tissues as well as any abnormalities the physician is trying to identify. This method has many advantages including the ability to rotate the 3D image in space or to view slices in succession, making it easier to find the exact place where a problem may be located.

How are CT scans used?

CT scans can be used to identify disease or injury within various regions of the body. For example, CT has become a useful screening tool for detecting possible tumors or lesions within the abdomen. A CT scan of the heart may be ordered when various types of heart disease or abnormalities are suspected. CT can also be used to image the head in order to locate injuries, tumors, clots leading to stroke, hemorrhage, and other conditions. It can image the lungs in order to reveal the presence of tumors, pulmonary embolisms (blood clots), excess fluid, and other conditions such as emphysema or pneumonia. A CT scan is particularly useful when imaging complex bone fractures, severely eroded joints, or bone tumors since it usually produces more detail than would be possible with a conventional x-ray.

Uses of CT scan

CT scans are used to look for many anatomical problems in the body such as:

How is CT scan done?

During a CT scan, you lie still on a table. The table slowly passes through the center of a large X-ray machine.

Does CT scan cause pain?

The test is painless.

Contrast dye and CT scan

As with all x-rays, dense structures within the body—such as bone—are easily imaged, whereas soft tissues vary in their ability to stop x-rays and, thus, may be faint or difficult to see. For this reason, intravenous (IV) contrast agents have been developed that are highly visible in an x-ray or CT scan and are safe to use in patients. Contrast agents contain substances that are better at stopping x-rays and, thus, are more visible on an x-ray image. For example, to examine the circulatory system, a contrast agent based on iodine is injected into the bloodstream to help illuminate blood vessels. This type of test is used to look for possible obstructions in blood vessels, including those in the heart. Oral contrast agents, such as barium-based compounds, are used for imaging the digestive system, including the esophagus, stomach, and GI tract.

Are there risks of CT scan?

CT scans can diagnose possibly life-threatening conditions such as hemorrhage, blood clots, or cancer. An early diagnosis of these conditions could potentially be life-saving. However, CT scans use x-rays, and all x-rays produce ionizing radiation. Ionizing radiation has the potential to cause biological effects in living tissue. This is a risk that increases with the number of exposures added up over the life of an individual. However, the risk of developing cancer from radiation exposure is generally small.

CT scan and pregnancy

A CT scan in a pregnant woman poses no known risks to the baby if the area of the body being imaged isn’t the abdomen or pelvis. In general, if imaging of the abdomen and pelvis is needed, doctors prefer to use exams that do not use radiation, such as MRI or ultrasound. However, if neither of those can provide the answers needed, or there is an emergency or other time constraint, CT may be an acceptable alternative imaging option.

In some patients, contrast agents may cause allergic reactions, or in rare cases, temporary kidney failure. IV contrast agents should not be administered to patients with abnormal kidney function since they may induce a further reduction of kidney function, which may sometimes become permanent.

Children and CT scan

Children are more sensitive to ionizing radiation and have a longer life expectancy and, thus, a higher relative risk for developing cancer than adults. Parents may want to ask the technologist or doctor if their machine settings have been adjusted for children.

Radiation and CT scan

Reduction in Radiation from Routine CT Scans is an area of research currently being investigated.




Articles on CT scan

This article is a stub. YOU can help Wikimd by expanding it!

 

WikiMD Resources 360 - CT scan
360.png
Scientific articles to social media

Articles

Policies / Guidelines
  1. Most recent articles
  2. Most cited articles
  3. Review articles
  4. in N Eng J Med, Lancet, BMJ
  1. US National Guidelines Clearinghouse
  2. NICE Guidance
  3. FDA on CT scan
  4. CDC on CT scan

Media articles

Patient Resources / Community
  1. Powerpoint Slides
  2. Google Images | Yale images
  3. Podcasts & MP3s
  4. Videos
  1. Patient Resources
  2. Discussion groups
  3. Patient Handouts
  4. Doctors for CT scan

Evidence Based Medicine

Healthcare Provider Resources
  1. Cochrane Collaboration
  2. Bandolier
  3. TRIP
  4. Edidence Based Medicine
  1. Condition/symptom
  2. Causes & Risk Factors
  3. Tests/studies
  4. Treatment

Clinical Trials

News
  1. Ongoing Clinical Trials
  2. Trial results
  3. Clinical Trials at Google
  1. CT scan in the news
  2. Be alerted on news
  3. News trends

Definition - CT scan

Social media posts - CT scan
  1. Definitions
Flickr

Books on the topic

Bing.png
  1. Books on CT scan
  2. Amazon on CT scan
Facebook posts
Tumblr

Continuing medical education (CME)

Quora.png
  1. CME Programs
Tweets
Commentary & Blogs
Yelp.png
  1. Blogs
  2. Commentary
  3. FAQ
  4. .Gov
  5. PDF files
YouTube videos
Pins
Instagram.png
Reddit
External:W8MD Weight Loss, Sleep & MedSpa Wellness Topics A-Z
W8md-logo.jpg

A | B | C | D | E | F | G

H | I | J | K | L | M | N

O | P | Q | R | S | T | U

V | W | X | Y | Z



WikiMD is a free medical encyclopedia and wellnesspedia moderated by medical professionals and is a reliable source of information on a wide range of health, weight loss and wellness related topics.

WikiMD Sponsors: W8MD Weight Loss, Sleep & Medical Aesthetics


W8MD MedSpa

Tired of being overweight or obese? W8MD's insurance weight loss program can HELP

  • W8MD IV Nutrition: Our IM and IV nutrition therapy includes booster shots for B12, vitamin B complex, Vitamin C, Detox treatments and IV nutrition therapy. learn more…
W8MD weight loss locations: Philadelphia weight loss | King of Prussia, PA weight loss | NYC weight loss | NJ weight loss

Medical Aesthetics

Contact us (718) 946-5501 | Why advertise on WikiMD?


Disclaimer: The entire contents of WIKIMD.ORG are for informational purposes only and do not render medical advice or professional services. If you have a medical emergency, you should CALL 911 immediately! Given the nature of the wiki, the information provided may not be accurate and or incorrect. Use the information on this wiki at your own risk! See full Disclaimers.WikiMD is supported by W8MD Weight loss, Poly-Tech Sleep & Medical Aesthetic Centers of America.